What a nutritionist eats when she starts feeling sick

Lee Holmes soup
Photo: Fair Winds Press
You’re at the office, hard at work, when your cubicle-mate shows up with a fist full of tissues and a nagging cough. Cue: panic. What can you do to avoid catching contagious bugs (short of threatening to work from home until spring)?
Heal Your Gut
Photo: Fair Winds Press

Cook. After all, you are what you eat, so whipping something up in the kitchen that’s both immunty-boosting and inflammation-fighting can help protect you from the inside out. At least, that’s what Lee Holmes, certified health coach, yoga teacher, and author of Heal Your Gutdoes when she starts to feel an inkling of sickness coming on.

Because she’s a pro, she’s devised a plan that doesn’t require holding your nose while chugging down some terrifying concoction. From vitamin C loaded nacho chips (yes, really!) to a soothing lemongrass Thai soup that will put your Seamless fave to shame, these recipes will fight the good fight all winter long.

Might be time to come up with another way to use those sick days….

Keep reading to see what nutritionist Lee Holmes eats when she starts feeling sick.

Lee Holmes turmeric Nachos
Photo: Lee Holmes

For a cold: Nachos—with a twist

Forget chicken soup—Holmes is all about snacking on nacho chips when she starts getting a little sniffly. The key here: they’re golden nacho chips. Yep, there’s turmeric in there.

The anti-inflammatory root “is good for all-around immunity, and I make my nachos with grated orange zest to get in some vitamin C, too,” she says. “Plus, the combo gives them just the loveliest color.”

Ingredients
1 cup almond meal
1 large organic egg
1 tsp turmeric
1/4 tsp cumin
1/4 tsp coriander
1 tsp grated orange zest
1 tsp Celtic sea salt
2 tomatoes, diced
1 cucumber, diced

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F.

2. Place all the chip ingredients in a large bowl and mix with a wooden spoon to form a dough.

3. Place the dough on a clean work surface between two pieces of parchment paper. Roll the dough out until it is 1/16 inch thick.

4. Remove the top piece of baking paper and transfer the dough and bottom piece of baking paper to a baking tray. Using a sharp knife, deeply score the dough every 1 1/4 inch, then do the same in the opposite direction so you form squares. Bake in the oven for 12 minutes.

5. Allow to cool before breaking them apart. To assemble the nachos, place the nachos chips on a chopping board, and top with the remaining ingredients. Any leftover chips will keep in an airtight container for up to three days.

Lee Holmes ginger tea tonicPhoto: Pixabay/Condesign

For a stomach bug: Ginger tea tonic

Gut problems are the worst. Luckily this is Holmes’ area of expertise, so she has a sure fix. “If you have a gut bug, garlic, ginger, and lemon in hot water is the best thing to drink,” she says. “Garlic is anti-bacterial, so it helps kill bad bacteria hanging around the gut, and the ginger is going to sooth you.”

Can’t tolerate sipping garlic? Holmes says a mixture of turmeric, ginger, lemon, and honey in hot water is a potent anti-bacterial alternative.

Ingredients
2 cups water
4 cloves garlic, minced
4 chucks of ginger root, grated
1 lemon

1. Boil water. Place garlic and ginger in water and leave covered for 15 minutes.

2. Add the juice from one lemon. Pour into a mug and drink.

Lee Holmes lemongrass Thai soup
Photo: Fair Winds Press

For a bacterial infection: Lemongrass Thai soup

“This recipe is a kaleidoscope treasure chest of medicinal herbs and spices,” Lee says. “The plant oils of lemongrass in particular have been shown to inhibit multi-resistant strains of bacteria and yeast, making it a must-have ingredient for strong immunity.”

You’ll also find Holmes’ go-to spice in the recipe (turmeric), along with apple cider vinegar.

Ingredients
3 cups vegetable stock
3 1/4 inch piece of galangal, peeled and grated
2 stalks of lemongrass, cut into 2-inch pieces
3 or 4 kaffir lime leaves, torn
4 scallions, sliced
7 drops liquid stevia
1 can additive-free coconut milk
1 Tbsp apple cider vinegar
2 Tbsp wheat-free tamari
1 red pepper, seeded and sliced
1 cup mushrooms, quartered
1/4 cup lime juice
Grated zest of one lime
Freshly cracked black pepper, to taste
Cilantro leaves, to serve

1. Bring the vegetable stock, galangal, lemongrass, kaffir lime leaves, scallions, and stevia to a boil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Reduce the heat to low and simmer for five minutes.

2. Stir through the coconut milk, vinegar, and tamari, then simmer for 10 minutes. Add the pepper and mushroom and simmer for another 5 minutes.

3. Remove from heat. Take out the lemongrass and lime leaves. Add the lime juice and zest, then puree in a food processor or blender until smooth. Serve with a grind of black pepper and garnish with cilantro.

Time to arm yourself with some more good advice: Here’s how to avoid burnout at work, and this 5-minute trick will calm your mind and gut in any situation.

GOOD FOOD| EMILY LAURENCE, JANUARY 19, 2017

Here’s What To Eat After Every Type Of Workout

We’ve all been there. You workout hard and, for one reason or another, you don’t eat quickly enough afterwards. You start to feel shaky, hangry, jittery and maybe even anxious.

Eating properly after exercise is important not only to replenish the energy you’ve just burned, but also to make sure you get the most out of your workout — so you can see the results you want.

“Post workout nutrition provides fuel and nutrients for the body and helps prevent blood sugar lows and fatigue,” nutritionist Fiona Tuck told The Huffington Post Australia. “The body needs nutrients to help with muscle recovery and cellular repair.”

Nutritionist and celebrity chef Zoe Bingley-Pullin agrees.

“Looking after yourself doesn’t stop at exercise — taking care of nutrition is critical,” Bingley-Pullin said. “Proper refuelling will also allow you to have more energy for your next workout.”

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The harder your workout, the higher your post-nutrition needs.

According to Alexandra Parker and Anna Debenham, accredited practising dietitians from The Biting Truth, whether you’re an amateur or a professional athlete, what you eat pre- and post-exercise is crucial.

“Following a workout, what you eat is vital in helping you reach your training and health goals and in ensuring you make the most of your workout,” Debenham said.

“Every time you exercise, carbohydrate stores (in the form of glycogen) are utilised for energy and your muscle protein is broken down. It’s therefore essential to replenish these stores afterwards.”

“Exercising actually makes your muscle tissues more sensitive to certain hormones and nutrients, which means that muscle is most responsive to nutrient intake during the first 30 to 90 minutes post-workout,” Parker added.

When it comes to post-workout recovery, always consider the three Rs:

Refuel

  • Refuel your glycogen (carbohydrate) stores to avoid muscle tissue breakdown and low energy.
  • Lack of glucose to fuel the brain can lead to decreased alertness and concentration, and low mood.
  • Aim for high quality carbohydrates sources (think wholegrain breads and cereals).

Repair

  • Repair damaged muscles with protein.
  • Consuming protein post-workout will provide amino acids for the building and repair of muscle tissue. This will help you to recover more quickly.
  • Aim for lean protein sources (think lean meats, eggs, nuts, legumes, tofu and reduced fat dairy).

Rehydrate

  • Rehydrate with fluids.
  • Most of us finish a workout at least a little dehydrated, and you will continue to lose fluids through sweating and breathing. It is essential that you replace these fluids immediately.
  • Your thirst is not the best gauge of hydration. The best way to tell how hydrated you are is to look at the colour of your urine. You want to aim for straw-coloured urine. The darker it is, the more dehydrated you are.

When we skip post-workout nutrition, the effects on the body are negative and quick to arise.

“While skipping a post-workout snack every now and then isn’t necessarily an enormous deal, it should never become a habit,” Parker told HuffPost Australia.

“If you don’t adequately replenish your stores following a workout, not only will you not make the most out of your workout, but your body can experience some other negative consequences.”

These include:

  • Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar levels), which can make you feel disoriented and could even cause you to pass out
  • Increased fatigue (during training and at work or school)
  • Reduced performance at your next training session or event
  • Suboptimal gains from the session just completed — you won’t make the most out of your workout
  • Increased muscle soreness.

“Blood sugar can drop which can lead us to feeling shaky, tired, lightheaded and even nauseated,” Tuck said. “The brain relies on a constant supply of glucose to stay mentally alert, so our attention can wane and we can feel low in energy and mood.”

TUCKO019 VIA GETTY IMAGES
This feeling is the worst.

When it comes to actual post-workout food, Parker said the type and amount comes down to your fitness goals, more so than the exercise itself.

“Generally, the principles are very much the same, but exactly what your body needs most varies slightly depending on the type of exercise you’re doing and what your goals are,” Parker said.

“The time of day of your workout is also going to make a difference to the meal or snack you have (lunch food is very different to a snack).”

As a general rule, Parker recommends that all post-exercise foods should be rich in good quality carbohydrates to replenish muscle fuel stores, contain some lean protein to repair muscles, and include a source of fluid and electrolytes to re-hydrate effectively.

“The higher the energy intake (calories) depends on the intensity of the amount of physical exercise,” Tuck explained. “Long distance endurance training or weight training or body building would be different to a relaxing yoga class, for example.”

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Here’s what to eat after different types of workouts.

1. Cardio work (e.g. running, endurance, cycling)

“The key is replenishing carbohydrate stores, and adequate hydration is essential,” Debenham said. “For example, a slice of whole grain bread with peanut butter and banana. It’s full of potassium which soothes muscles, high quality carbs, protein and heart healthy fats.”

Other great post-cardio options include: a banana and a handful of nuts, or 1-2 slices of whole grain toast with either ricotta and fruit or cottage cheese and tomato.

“Athletes, such as endurance runners and cyclists, need specific sports nutrition to ensure adequate nutrients and calories are consumed for the body to be able to function at its optimum,” Tuck told HuffPost Australia.

“This may involve consuming nutrients and electrolytes during the actual exercise, as well as pre- and post-work out nutrition.”

GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO

2. Pilates or barre

“Again, it depends on your goal. Is the goal to lose weight, or perhaps you’re looking to boost core strength and increase your muscle mass,” Debenham said.

“If your goal is weight loss, then a nutrient rich meal within 60 minutes of your workout is essential as the meal will be more efficiently digested. If your goal is to improve strength, then protein is key.”

Try two hard boiled eggs with multigrain toast, or a slice of roasted vegetable and feta frittata.

3. Yoga

“Your food choices post-yoga should aim to repair your tired muscles and replenish your energy stores,” Parker said. “To do this, your body needs a hit of protein, some low GI carbohydrates and fruits or vegetables.

“Try a small tub of Greek yoghurt with a couple of spoons of natural muesli containing nuts and fruit. Or for something savoury, a small can of tuna, four bean mix and some chopped veggies.”

YULIA_DAVIDOVICH

4. Resistance or strength training

If your goal is to gain muscle, then an energy-rich diet with adequate amounts of protein is just as important as your well-developed strength training program.

“While an increased intake is essential for muscle gain, your intake should be low in fat and high in nutrients,” Parker said.

“Following strength training, protein should be consumed. Consuming carbohydrates in conjunction with protein allows the protein to be used for muscle growth and repair.”

“Smoothies are a great option and easy if you’re on the run. Simply blitz the ingredients together in the blender the night before (berries, low fat yoghurt, oats).”

Tuck recommends trying a delicious chocolate smoothie with protein powder, banana, cacao and milk.

“This provides carbs, protein, fats and important minerals such as potassium and magnesium,” Tuck said.

CHIOCIOLLA

5. High intensity interval training (e.g. cross fit, HIIT)

After high intensity interval training, Debenham recommends opting for an egg omelette with sautéed onions and capsicum, plus a bowl of chopped fruit. Hint: include pineapple.

“Aside from their protein content, eggs are high in leucine which triggers muscle protein synthesis. The vitamin C in the capsicums is essential for maintaining healthy cartilage you need to cushion your bones,” Debenham said.

“Research suggests that bromelain (an enzyme in pineapple) may help to reduce exercise induced inflammation.”

Another delicious option is overnight oats — simply combine oats, yoghurt or milk of choice, mashed banana and chia seeds.

MARIA SHUMOVA VIA GETTY IMAGES

Other post-workout snack and meal ideas:

  • Peanut butter and banana in a whole grain wrap
  • Lean chicken and salad roll
  • Bowl of muesli with yogurt and berries
  • Fresh fruit salad with Greek yogurt
  • Tin of tuna with crackers, plus a banana
  • Lean meat, chicken or fish with potato and vegetables
  • Stir fry with lean meat
  • Toast with banana, reduced-fat ricotta and honey, plus an orange.

11/01/2017 1:38 PM AEDT | Updated 13/01/2017 8:41 AM AEDT|Juliette Steen|Associate Food Editor, HuffPost Australia

Injured? Tips on maintaining your physical and mental fitness

My knee benched me for the beginning of the high-school season, a blow that hit my fragile teen psyche the hardest. I felt inferior, damaged, irrelevant.

So, when I spotted this BeWell@Stanford piece on exercising with injuries, I devoured it eagerly. Although I’m much healthier emotionally than I was as a teen, I know I want to remain active, period.

In the Q&A, Gordon Matheson, MD, PhD, a sports medicine physician, says that an injury shouldn’t kill your workout: “Fortunately, programs can be devised that work around almost any musculoskeletal condition.”

He also weighs in on the mental benefits of exercise:

Regular exercise has two main effects. One is that exercise builds greater capacity within your body; it increases bone, cartilage, muscle, joint and heart health; and helps manage weight. The other effect is something known as self-efficacy or confidence. Both are equally important. Even if you aren’t exercising vigorously, the fact that you are taking time to do something good for your body sets the mental stage for further development of your exercise goals. Once you incorporate exercise as a means of increasing the health of your daily life, you will experience an empowerment that helps to overcome the feelings of frustration and limitation.

The article also includes advice from Joyce Hanna, associate director of the Stanford Health Improvement Program, on remaining on track when you have to change your exercise program. For example:

Exercise keeps you aware of the state of your body. When you’re running, or exercising vigorously, you get some feedback if you’ve eaten too much or too little. Your body sends you a message if you’re dehydrated. You can feel bloated and stiff if you’ve had too much salt or alcohol the night before. You have trouble finishing your workout if you’ve gone without enough sleep for a number of nights. All this feedback works to help you take care of yourself and to pay attention to habits that affect your health. So it’s important to pay attention to your body if you’re not able to exercise. Don’t check out and get numb to the effects of your eating, drinking, and sleeping habits. Pay attention.

I will, thanks.

 

A conversation about the merits of stretching

A life-long runner, I have spent my fair share of time in physical therapists’ offices seeking treatment for fitness-related injuries. Often during these visits, health-care providers assess my flexibility, deem it unsatisfactory and recommend a variety of stretches to further protect my muscles, tendons and joints from harm. But over the years, several studies have suggested that stretching may not actually help prevent injuries and the contradictory findings have left me with a lot of questions.

To get some answers I turned to Michael Fredericson, MD, who has served as the head team physician with the Stanford Sports Medicine Program since 1992. In this two-part Q&A, Fredericson discusses the role of flexibility in injury prevention and fitness performance and what the scientific evidence indicates about the effectiveness of stretching.

From a biomechanics point of view, how does flexibility influence athletic performance and help reduce the potential for injury?

It is difficult to make a vast generalization about the impact of flexibility because of the broad scope of biomechanical stresses and physical requirements throughout various athletic endeavors. For example, functional flexibility for a hurdler requires greater lengthening of the hamstring and a greater range of motion than for distance running. But in general the concern is when stretching increases a person’s flexibility beyond what is required for a specific motion.

Excessive flexibility may impair performance in sports where a high degree of flexibility is not required. For example, runners with less flexibility are actually more efficient at running. One example in a study involving 100 people, researchers evaluated participants’ flexibility with 11 different tests and then measured their efficiency while walking and running. Results showed, participants who were the most flexible expended 10 to 12 percent more energy to move at the same speed as compared with those that were the least flexible.

In everyday life, individuals maintain flexibility in a specific joint by using it. As we age, decreased activity and lack of use of a joint leads to reduced flexibility. The same is true for athletes. Participating in the sport itself provides the stimulus required to maintain their necessary range of motion. So, in many sports it is more desirable to achieve the required range of motion through specific actions that simulate the movements of the sport, rather than with prolonged stretching. Intense stretching could result in the range of motion exceeding what is needed for athletes to compete and consequently diminishing their performance.

There is an ongoing debate on if static stretching, where you hold a position for 20-30 seconds, is beneficial. How effective is this style of stretching?

Static stretching can increase muscle length but this doesn’t necessarily benefit all athletes equally. While some athletes such as gymnasts and swimmers may need to gain flexibility, being excessively flexible doesn’t benefit distance runners. Consider the standard hamstring stretch. Stretching your hamstring teaches the muscle to relax when the knee is fully extended. However, this doesn’t benefit runners. Instead, runners need to have their hamstrings stiff and activated when the knees are extended. Additionally, studies such as a recent USA Track and Field study (.pdf), have found that static stretching seems to have little benefit in terms of injury prevention, particularly against the overuse injuries common in running.

Another thing to keep in mind is that prolonged stretching, greater than 60 seconds, prior to athletic activity can reduce maximum force production with the loss of voluntary strength and muscular power. This effect can last up to one hour after stretching. For this reason, intense stretching is not typically recommended prior to competition. However many athletes, especially dancers and others participating in activities that require more than average flexibility, may still find shorter bouts of static stretching beneficial.

Salar Deldar, a third-year medical resident at Stanford, contributed information to this entry. The Q&A continues tomorrow with a discussion about the effectiveness of stretching before a workout vs. afterwards and the role of genetics in flexibility.

Photo by lululemon athletica

[Original Article on November 7, 2011

 

The Greatest Fitness Tips. Ever.

[Original Article]

Our all-time best fitness advice, all in one place.

Photo: Kurt Markus

Three decades ago, endurance training consisted of pretty much one workout: all-out, all the time. Then fitness went mainstream, CEOs started wearing spandex, and “sports scientist” became a legitimate career goal. The result? Periodization, VO2 max, functional strength, and more. Herewith, a highly concentrated dose of Outside training advice distilled from 30 years of health-and-fitness expertise.

Get a Routine 
Embrace daily rituals, whether it’s making coffee just so or walking the dog. Routines can lower blood pressure and slow heart rate.

Learn from Other Athletes 
“The Kenyan runners who always win marathons never jog,” says pro soccer player LANDON DONOVAN. So Donovan trains at 80 percent of his maximum heart rate until he’s exhausted, teaching his body “recovery endurance” through a sequence of sprints and rests. Over time, you’ll still need to give your body a break to optimize gains (see Train with a Plan, below), but this ability to push yourself to the brink of collapse and recover quickly is essential for top aerobic athletes.

Turn Big Challenges into Small Goals 
“Think only about the present and focus on micro-goals,” says ultramarathoner DEAN KARNAZES. “Just make it to that stop sign up ahead; OK, now make it to the tree up the street; and so on.”

Find Your Lactate Threshold 
What’s that? LT is the point at which lactic acid accumulates in your blood faster than your body can process it—causing a drop in performance (read: pain). Training below your LT builds aerobic capacity. Training above it builds speed. How to determine your LT:

  1. Warm up, 10 minutes.
  2. With a heart-rate monitor on, run or cycle on a flat course as fast as you can for 30 minutes.
  3. Your LT is your average heart rate for that period.

Protect Your Knees
By doing nothing. A lot of blown ACLs could be avoided by simply staying down and resting after a fall. A stretched ACL is easily torn
on subsequent falls.

To Get Faster, You Must Push Yourself 
“A runner churning out seven-minute miles will never know how quickly his arms and legs have to move to run a six-minute mile. You can’t practice by running slow.” —MARK VERSTEGEN, Athletes’ Performance founder, author of the Core Performance series

Train with a Plan
Here’s how to reach peak shape for any sport with one 12-week program.
FIRST MONTH: Complete a full-body weight-lifting circuit twice weekly. Do your cardio workouts on three other days, going long once. Each week, increase the duration of the long day’s workout by 10 percent. During the fourth week, cut the workout load by 50 percent.
SECOND MONTH: Follow the first month’s plan, but cut back to lifting once a week and add another day of cardio. During the eighth week, which is for recovery, cut everything in half.
THIRD MONTH: Stop lifting and use that day for cross-training. Ramp up speed by completing one cardio day each week with intervals at your intended race pace. Your long cardio day remains the same for the first two weeks, and for weeks 11 and 12 you cut its duration in half. During week 12, taper by doing only 50 percent of week 11’s work.

Cheat Sheet 
Lift. Lower weights slowly. It helps train your muscles to absorb shock and control your descent in real-world action.
Hydrate. For workouts lasting one hour or less, drink only water. For longer outings, bring a sports drink with carbs.
Relax. Don’t try to make up for missed workouts by doing two long days back to back. If you miss a day, just let it go.

Maintain Base Fitness
“Never get so out of shape that getting back into shape would be a monumental effort,” says alpinist CONRAD ANKER. “I do two things every year: climb El Capitan and do a marathon-length run. They give me goals, and I train accordingly.”

Have Fun
“A competition is just to show off how hard you’ve been playing,” says freestyle kayaking champ ERIC JACKSON, who credits the fun factor for his success.

Schedule Recovery Time 
You’re not slacking off; you’re recovering. Take two days off each week, an easy week every month, and a month of active rest—like surfing or riding a cruiser—per year.

Cross-Train with the Right Sport 
Runners: Cycling maintains leg strength and cardio fitness while giving you a break from impact on your joints.
Cyclists: Running and rowing develop strength in the torso, quads, and glutes.
Climbers: Calisthenics use body-weight resistance to build strength without adding bulk.
Swimmers: Rowing builds key strength in the shoulders, arms, legs, and torso.
Kayakers: Swimming works the arms, shoulders, and torso, improving power and range of motion.

Mix It Up
“Strength and endurance are of equal importance, so if you only have limited time, do a little of both.” —MARK ALLEN, six-time Kona Ironman champ

You Need More Than Calcium
Bones weaken if you do only low-impact activities. Strengthen your skeleton by mixing in high-impact workouts like running, jumping rope, or playing ball sports.

Work Your Core
A weak trunk can cause chronic back pain and other torso problems. The prevention: crunches and planks (brace yourself on forearms and toes, body rigid like a plank).

Build Functional Strength
“When you sit down on an exercise machine, with your back against a chair, you tend to shut down the rest of your body,” warns LAIRD HAMILTON. “You want strength that you can actually control and apply.” It’s called functional strength, and it dictates the way you should lift weights. Here’s our complete workout. Do Group 1 once a week. Two days later, do Group 2. Concentrate on smooth, controlled lifts throughout.

Group 1 (10–12 reps)
(a) Dumbbell flies lying on a stability ball
(b) Barbell squats
(c) Wide-grip pull-ups
(d) Medicine-ball chops
(e) Standing dumbbell pullovers
(f) Dumbbell lunges
(g) Standing bent-over rows with hand on
a stability ball
(h) Upright barbell rows

Group 2 (25 reps)
(a) Stability-ball push-ups
(b) Stability-ball crunches

Don’t Overdo It
Unless you’re winning prize money, allow six months between marathons or Ironman triathlons.

Listen to Your Heart
It will help you avoid overtraining during intervals. Use a two-to-one work-to-recovery ratio. Let’s say your intervals last two minutes each. After the first one, recover for one minute and check your heart rate. The first time your heart rate fails to drop to this number on subsequent intervals, you’re done.

Stretching Is No Joke
OK, the scorpion pose is a joke. But daily yoga or stretching improves flexibility and muscle endurance.

From the Vault The Life & Times of Outside
On Second Thought…
Wow. As much as the exceedingly wise counsel here makes us feel all warm and fuzzy inside, we’ve also spouted some really bad health-and-fitness advice over the years. For example, the time we tendered this moronic little gem: “Exercising above 85 percent of your maximum heart rate yields little or no additional cardiovascular benefit” (7/86). D’oh! But wait, it gets much, much worse. Somewhere among the six cigarette ads in our June ’83 Best of Summer issue, you’ll find this: “Tanning shouldn’t inspire guilt…. Relax. Enjoy the heat. You’re going to look great.” But don’t forget your “tanning product”: “Choose a label showing someone with a tan you especially like, then buy that one.” OK! And those strange new “SPF” numbers on some bottles? “Some mathematically inclined people pay attention to them.” But in our defense, way back in the fall of ’79, we had the good sense to hold up for ridicule Chicago physician Allan Charles, who opined that jogging could make a woman’s insides fall out. “Their pelvic muscles are too weak,” said the good doctor. “They’re perforated by the vagina.”

Don’t Blame Food 
“Thinking that carbs make you fat is wrong,” says CHRIS CARMICHAEL, founder and head coach of Carmichael Training Systems. “You’re fat because you’re not exercising. To simply blame a food type for being fat is bullshit.”

Keep Your Head in the Game
Mental fitness can be just as important as the physical sort. Surfer KELLY SLATER says his record seventh world title was due largely to the personal growth he achieved from healing strained family relationships. “I’m relaxed as I’ve ever been,” he said prior to winning.

Hit the Sack 
Skimping on sleep triggers a decrease in human growth hormone (HGH), which can cause muscles to wither and fat to build up. It’s crucial for everyone to get a full eight hours of sleep each night, and you can use an afternoon nap to reach that eight-hour goal.

Understand What Motivates You
“I don’t know if it’s so much winning but the fear of losing,” LANCE ARMSTRONG famously said before winning the Tour de France in 2003. “I don’t like to lose. I just despise it.”

Boost Immunity
How?  

  1. Exercise five days a week.
  2. Get antioxidants from whole foods, not supplements.
  3. Wash hands frequently and thoroughly.
  4. Get a flu shot.

Listen to Your Mother 
Straighten up. Balance, coordination, and flexibility all begin with good posture. When standing erect, you should be able to draw a line from your ear to your heel, with the line bisecting your shoulder, passing through your hip, and grazing the back of your knee.

Stock Your Travel Kit
Keep this in your Dopp kit, and hope you don’t need it:
IBUPROFEN and aspirin for sore muscles.
ACETAMINOPHEN (Tylenol) for pain from viral illnesses (colds, flu) and injuries involving bleeding.
COLD TABLETS containing pseudoephedrine to clear up sinus congestion without causing drowsiness.
ANTIBACTERIAL SOAP and hydrogen peroxide for cleaning wounds.
SHOT GLASS, in case none of the above works.

Have More Friends!
“Energy makes people beautiful,” says JACK LALANNE. “You don’t want to be close to someone who’s dead and crapped out all the time, who’s bitching that it’s a lousy fucking world and ‘Christ, my ulcers are killing me.'”

Stay Trim

  1. Lift weights to build muscle. This raises your resting metabolic rate, the energy you burn to keep your body (and muscles) alive.
  2. Eat often, approximately every three hours. Eating frequent, small meals is linked with lower body-fat percentage.
  3. Avoid calorie-dense foods, like sweets and dried fruits. Eat more foods with high levels of water and fiber, like raw vegetables and whole grains.
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